At The Gallows
ancientpeoples:

Gold disk showing a rosette 
1.5 x 0.4cm (5/8 x 1/8 inch.) 
Etruscan, 7th - 5th century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

ancientpeoples:

Gold disk showing a rosette 

1.5 x 0.4cm (5/8 x 1/8 inch.) 

Etruscan, 7th - 5th century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

nightspeech:

oops i made doodle

nightspeech:

oops i made doodle

guyletatooer:

First session on Anh’s feet .
At Maudit Caillou Studio
Toulouse , FRANCE

virtual-artifacts:

Ceremonial knife Tumi (detail), Chimú North coast, Peru, A.D. 1100/1470

Naymlap, the heroic founder-colonizer of the Lambayque valley on the north coast of Peru, is thought to be the legendary figure represented on the top of this striking gold tumi (ceremonial knife). The knife would have been carried by dynastic rulers during state ceremonies to represent, in a more precious form, the copper knives used for animal sacrifices. Here Naymlap stands with his arms to his abdomen and his feet splayed outward. His headdress has an elaborate open filigree design and is festooned with various small gold ornaments. Turquoise—for the peoples of ancient Peru, a precious gem related to the worship of water and sky—is inlaid around the headdress and in the ear ornaments. The tumi was made with diverse metalworking techniques. Solid casting was used to produce the blade. The face and body were created with annealing (heating, shaping, and then cooling) and repoussé, in which the design is hammered in relief from the reverse side. Finally, the small ornaments at the top of the headdress were separately hammered or cast, then soldered into place. This tumi and many other gold, silver, and textile objects were made in royal workshops and ceremonially presented to high officials as emblems of rank and authority. (via The Art Institute of Chicago)

My order came today 5 days earlier than it was supposed to

These make me feel soft and squishy -w-

ahistoryofweedcraft:

Breast mandalas handpoked by me (grace neutral)

archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Medical Scalpel, 1st-3rd Century AD

archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Medical Scalpel, 1st-3rd Century AD

nerveslikesteel:

Scarificator (1910s-20s)Scarificators were used in bloodletting. The spring-loaded blades in this device would cut into the skin, and a special rounded glass cup could be applied over the wound. When warmed, it would help draw the blood out at a faster rate.
Saw one of these whilst visiting a museum of curiosities today. The world was once a much more intense place to live. I won’t lie, this did make my skin crawl, in a curious way.
The photo I obtained from google doesn’t look as intimidating as the one at the museum was. This one is less rusty and well lit.

nerveslikesteel:

Scarificator (1910s-20s)
Scarificators were used in bloodletting. The spring-loaded blades in this device would cut into the skin, and a special rounded glass cup could be applied over the wound. When warmed, it would help draw the blood out at a faster rate.

Saw one of these whilst visiting a museum of curiosities today. The world was once a much more intense place to live. I won’t lie, this did make my skin crawl, in a curious way.

The photo I obtained from google doesn’t look as intimidating as the one at the museum was. This one is less rusty and well lit.

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Anonymous

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